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HISTORIC NEW YORK
JOHNSON HALL 1763

Sir William Johnson (1715 - 1774). Indian Trader, statesman, diplomat and Colonial Empire Builder. In 1763 built Johnson hall, the center of his estate and the scene of many Indian conferences.

Coming from Ireland in 1738, Johnson traded with the Indians and acquired great influence over them. After defeating the French at Lake George in 1755, he was created a baronet and made Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Northern Colonies. In 1766 he ended the Pontiac uprising, and in 1768 negotiated the Treaty at Fort Stanwix.

At Johnstown, which he founded and colonized, Johnson Hall stands as a monument to his collective achievement
.

LARGE HISTORIC AREA ROAD SIDE MARKER, (JOHNSON HALL):

This marker is self explanatory. The State no longer supplies these cast metal roadside historic markers to communities but a few years ago they produced a larger marker to be allowed at major highway rest areas and scenic overlooks. The only rest area in Fulton County that qualified was on Route 30 and 29, east of the Vail's Mills intersection of Routes 30 and 29. This large marker is placed in the woods at this turn off rest area and is sometimes missed while driving by.

Location: This marker is on Route 29 east, between the Vail's Mills intersection of Route 29 east, between the Vail's Mills intersection of Routes 29 and 30 and before the intersection of Second Street and Route 29 on the south side in the woods at the rest area. There is a narrow path up the hill to the marker. The date on this marker states the year 1961.


Old Church Grave Yard, Early Dutch Reformed Church:

This marker directs you to an old burial ground in the wooded area behind the sign and the site of the 1792 Dutch Reformed Church. This old cemetery has been abandoned for years and many of its grave markers have deteriorated. The Mayfield Historical Society saw fit to mark this site; this being one of the first installed historical markers in recent years by the Historical Society. It is located in the town of Mayfield , the Vail's Mills Settlement. Vail's Mills at one time was a thriving community in the town of Mayfield.

Location: This marker is one quarter of a mile pass Route 30, on Route 15 (Extension of West Main Street, Broadalbin) and located on the North side of 155.

THE OLD HOTEL BROADLBIN, A VILLAGE LANDMARK:

This marker was chosen to be erected by the town of Broadalbin Bicentennial Committee for the American Revolution in 1976. The Town Historian then was Lew Cornell. The old Broadalbin Hotel has been a landmark in the village of Broadalbin since it was established in 1854 and it has seen renovation through the years. It served as a hotel, one time as a hospital, a glove shop and again today (1997) as an inn and dining hall.

Location: the marker is in the village of Broadalbin on W. Main Street ( Route 155), on the south side near the intersection of Second Street, at the present Hotel Broadalbin.

GPS: 43° 3.424' N, 74° 11.964' W.

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VETERANS HALL

J.B. McKean post car first met here February 23rd, 1891.
R.L. Walsh post American Legion first met here September 19th, 1919.
108 years serving America.

Location: Downtown Broadalbin

KITTY HUSTED

IN MEMORY OF "MISS KITTY", A SUMMER RESIDENT, WHO WAS A
MAJOR BENEFACTOR OF
BROADALLBIN IN THE
LATE 1800'S.

MARKS THE SITE OF KITTY HUSTED:

Kitty Husted, "Miss Kitty" as she was known, maintained a summer residence in the village of Broadalbin. She was active in local civic matters and beautification of the village and was one of its benefactors during her residence in the late 1800's. The Broadalbin Historical Society , along with the town historian, Mr. Jay Nellis, chose to honor her memory in 1994 with this historic marker which was erected at the site of her summer home.

Location: Take route 155 ( W. Main Street) into the village of Broadalbin, turn north at the village square (monument) on to North Main Street, then veer to the right, this becomes North Street ( route 117). Proceed one block and take the first street on your right ( Maple Street). The marker is three doors down on your left from Thompson St. intersection (north side).

More about the Broadalbin Husted Family

 

THE SITE OF THE HOME OF ROBERT W. CHAMBERS:

This historic marker is placed at the entrance of the old Robert W. Chambers home, which now in 1997, is the rectory house for St. Joseph's Catholic Church. Robert W. Chambers was a well known author of his day and resided here in the village of Broadalbin. He is noted for the numerous novels he has written, some of which have a local historic background. Chambers was an illustrator as well and known as a local amateur entomologist. This marker was erected in 1976 during the Bicentennial of the American Revolution and dedicated through the effort of the Fulton County Bicentennial Coordinator, lewis G. Decker and the Town Supervisor, Mr. Robert Leslie.

Location: This marker , located in the village of Broadalbin, is at the gate 9entrance) to his old estate, just a few feet from the intersection of N. Main and North Street (route 117) on the North side.

More About Robert W. Chambers

 

NICK STONER HUT

HERE HENRY STONER AND HIS SONS NICK AND JOHN HELD THE CABIN AGAINST THE TORY AND INDIAN RAIDERS WHO BURNED
BROADALBIN, JUNE 1778

HENRY STONER"S HOME:

This marker is unique as it is in the Town of Mayfield, although you have to travel through the Village of Broadalbin to reach it. it had been destroyed years ago and for years only the post was left. The Mayfield Historical Society recently took the initiative to replace this sign. The actual site of John Stoner's cabin was just behind this marker (east). It is believed that the log cabin had no foundation. John Stoner was killed during the war for independence at a temporary farm site he was occupying during that war, out by F.M.C.C.. His son Nicholas became famous in later years after the war and many local stories have been written about him. The present marker was copied word for word, from the original. You can find some interesting stories on the Stoner Family in Donald William's books, "The Saga of Nichols Stoner" and "Nicholas Stoner and the Sammons Boys"

Location: Take West Main Street in the Village of Broadalbin and turn north onto North Second Street. The marker is on the east side of the road, shortly after you cross the town line. The original marker was suggested by Robert W. Chambers and installed in 1932.

 


LOCUST GROVE

1805 Home of Col. Tiffany Brockway. War of 1812 veteran abolitionist. Used as a stop on the underground railroad for fugitive slaves going North.

Location: Route 30 Broadalbin

"Tiffany Brockway came to previously purchased lands northeast of Fonda’s Bush in 1791 at the age of seventeen. Here he built a log house, made a clearing, and sowed a field of wheat, welcoming his father, Nathan, and family to their new forest home on his 18th birthday, March 6, 1792. On April 11, 1799, he was married to Lucy Alvord and in 1805 located on a farm near his father’s, afterward known as Locust Grove, where he remained till his death. He was a major in the war of 1812 and for many years following was a colonel of militia. Industrious, economic, temperate, integral, he was the first pronounced abolitionist in the town. At the advanced age of sixty he united with the Broadalbin Baptist church, living through many more years of a vigorous and useful old age, and passing away on Dec. 3, 1866, still rejoicing over the achievement of his fondest hope for the slave."

The above excerpt came from A Broadalbin History by By R. J. HONEYWELL and was contributed to Fulton County NYGenWeb by James F. Morrison, from his personal historical collection. It was transcribed for the web site by Lori Mosher. Read More Here

FRENCHMANS CREEK

This marker designates a place name given to a tributary or creek that empties into the Great Sacandaga Lake. The creek derived its name from one of the areas early pioneers, a Frenchman by the name of Joseph De Golyer who first settled on its banks when it was but a wilderness. By 1810 Duncan McMartin had established a saw, grist and woolen mill on this creek. McMartin was known as a surveyor, lawyer and judge of common plea by 1813 and later became elected as a State Senator.

Location: This marker is located on the south side of Route 110, north, out of the village of Broadalbin where the creek crosses the highway.

 

HANS' CREEK :

This marker also designates a place in the northern portion of the Town of Broadalbin which is one of the tributaries emptying into the Great Sacandaga Lake. It was so named by Sir William Johnson on one of his many fishing excursions on the old Sacandaga Vlaie. An incident occurred when a fishing companion of Sir William, a Dutchman by the name of John Conye, fell out of the boat they were fishing in and nearly drowned. Hans was derived from the German version of the name John.

Location: This marker is located north on Route 110, beyond the settlement of North Broadalbin and near the settlement known as Benedict Corners. Here the road makes a turn and near by Hans Creek crosses. ( Note: this maker is somewhat hidden by the trees around it. It is located on the south side of the road by the creek.)

 

MARVIN HOUSE:

The old Marvin Home was one of the community's older homes. David Marvin was a Revolutionary War soldier and one of the early settlers of old Fish House; after the war he settled here from Connecticut. David is buried in the old Presbyterian Church Grave Yard in the hamlet of Fish House The Marvin Home survived the flooding of the Great Sacandaga Reservoir and was moved to this later location in 1929. This old home was left-in-tack until 1996, when it was purposely burned to the ground. This caused concern in the neighborhood and a special meeting was held to see if the rest of the old homes here could be protected. Dr. Marvin's office is a small brick structure used today as a summer camp and located just up the road from this marker.

Location: As you enter the Fish House Hamlet, this marker is on the north side of Route 110 and west of the intersection of 109 and 110.

 


Old Fish House Hotel

SIR WILLIAM JOHNSON"S FISH HOUSE LODGE

This historic roadside marker directs you to the site of the hunting and fishing retreat which Sir William had built on the old Sacandaga River as early as 1762 and was known as his "Fish House". Others began to settle here and this little settlement became known as the Fish House settlement.

Originally named Northampton, no one ever called it that; and years later the name was changed officially to Fish House. The original fish house lodge of sir William was believed to have been destroyed in one of the raids in 1781, during the American Revolutionary War.

Location: this marker is located in the hamlet of fish house, on the north side of route 110 (the Broadalbin to Bachelorville road) and across from the intersection of route 109 ( the road south to Hagadorn mills).

Fish House

Here's a rare picture of the Fish House Community Center that started out
as a school. Note how clear the land around it was.

"Fish House did not grow like other villages, since its early inhabitants were for the most part wealthy, conservative people who did not wish their larges estates to be carved into building lots…(in time the town would become known for its) elm-lined street, the classic homes, the magnificent two-laned bridge…before 1900 there were five sawmills, a shingle shop, two chair factories, two tanneries, a glove shop, two harness shops, a skin mill, a cheese factory, a cheese box factory, four shoe cobblers, a gunsmith, several blacksmiths, two tailors and a clock maker….a school, three churches and four hotels." (From Charlotte Russell's "Northampton: Times Past, Times Present," as quoted in this article.)



contributed to Fulton County NYGenWeb
by Stephan G. Dennie

OLD COVERED BRIDGE AT FISH HOUSE:

This old covered bridge passed way during the construction of the present day Great Sacandaga Lake It connected this portion of the Town of Northampton with the rest of the northern town. Today the Hamlet of Fish House is isolated from the rest of the Town of Northampton. This old bridge was a local landmark and well remembered by our older residents. There was an attempt to save this old landmark but it was destroyed in 1930.

Location: This marker is at the intersection in the Hamlet of Fish House on Route 110, on the north side, across from the Route 109 intersection.

"The Fish House bridge was built in 1818, by Daniel Stewart. The then wide awake spirit of the little hamlet known as Fish House, and the rich farming country lying beyond, together with the prospect of Fish House being one day the great center of trade for this northern region, incited the dwellers therein to use every effort in their power to realize their hopes. The inhabitants petitioned the legislature for and received an appropriation of $5,000 for the building of the bridge. To this the citizens added by subscription $500. The bridge is now in the best possible condition, well covered and protected from decay. Before it was built, the Sacandaga was crossed by canoe and by fording. During the spring and fall freshets the people were very much inconvenienced, as they could not cross with teams, and many times it was unsafe for canoes. The old ford was from a few rods below where the south end of the bridge now is, to a short distance above the north end."

The above history was taken from: "History of Montgomery and Fulton Counties, N.Y.", (New York: F. W. Beers & Co.) 1878, page 233. was contributed to Fulton County NYGenWeb by Stephan G. Dennie

Read more about Covered Bridges in the Sacandaga Valley Here

GODFREY SHEW ORIGINAL HOME SITE

This marker designates one of the early settler's homes, in the Town of Northampton. There have been amazing stories of Godfrey's sons and their exploits during our fight for independence. The old Sacandaga River was a main artery from the east to the Hudson and the Champlain Corridor and many raids into the Mohawk Valley used this route through this river system and traveled by canoe. Those living along it were isolated and vulnerable to these raiding parties. Mr. Donald Sawyer wrote a wonderful book on the Shew Family titled, "They came to Sacandaga".

Location: This marker is located on the north side of Route 110, in the Hamlet of Fish House at the Saratoga County boundary line.

More about the Shew's of Fish House from Fulton County NYGenWeb

 

Photo Submitted by Sacandaga Calendars!

Photo Submitted by Sacandaga Calendars!

More about the Shew's of Fish House from Fulton County NYGenWeb

SHEW'S HILL: ON JUNE 3, 1778 GODFREY SHEW STATIONED HIS SON JACOB TO REPORT APPROACH TORY AND INDIAN RAIDERS UNDER CO. ROSS. LATER FAMILY MADE PRISONERS.

IF you read the exploits of the Shew family of old Fish House, they mention a high rise of ground overlooking the Sacandaga River; it became a good location to see anyone passing up or down the river. During the many aids down the Sacandaga during our American Revolutionary War, Godfrey Shew used this location to station one of his sons, to forewarn them of any approaching enemy. It has ever since been known locally as Shew's Hill. The Fish House (Northampton) Cemetery is located here as well and the Home of Doctor Orton, an early physician in the town. His son, Percy Orton, was instrumental in suggesting a number of these markers in the hamlet.

Location: this marker is located in the Hamlet of Fish House, on the north side of a short dead end road off Route 110. It is the first road pass the intersection in the hamlet of Fish House ( Rout 110 and 109). Turn off Route 110 by the Methodist Church, proceed down the dead end road, and it is just a short way down on the north side of the road.

"Early in the morning of June 3rd, Woodworth with Godfrey and John Shew left the house in order to find the enemy's whereabouts. Jacob and Stephen stayed behind to guard the house. After traveling some distance, the scouting party was surprised and taken prisoners by a party of Indians under Lieutenant John Ross. They were taken to the enemy's nearby encampment.

Jacob who had been stationed on a knoll near the house that overlooked the nearby Sacondaga River, saw a canoe coming down the river and he ran back home to inform his mother about the presence of the enemy that came from another direction.

The Shew home and barn were set on fire leaving Mrs. Shew with her small children homeless. The enemy took Jacob and Stephen to the main encampment where the other prisoners were held. Mrs. Shew with her children started Johnstown and they arrived there on June 4th.

On December 1st, Jacob with his father and brother with other prisoners were put on ships and taken to Boston where they would be exchanged for prisoners held by the Americans. The Shews on being set free started on their long journey home. On reaching Sudbury about twenty miles from Boston, Jacob took sick with small-pox. Jacob was left with a Patriot family to be cared for. Godfrey and Stephen continued on their journey home and they reached Johnstown on January 1, 1779, New Year's Day. Jacob arrived at Johnstown cured of the small-pox on March 17, 1779, it being St. Patrick's Day."

The above is transcribed from pages of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution By James F. Morrison and typed by dedicated volunteer, Peggy Menear for Fulton County NYGenWeb
Read More Here

Photos Submitted by Sacandaga Calendars!

THE ST. JOHN HOUSE:

This is one of the older homes, in the Fish House Settlement, still existing today Among other things, Alexander St. John was a surveyor and engineer. He is credited by some historians as having the village and town of St. Johnsville named after him. He became one of the town's leading citizens and is buried in the Fish House Cemetery, not far from his old home. This old home in Fish House, like others here, should be preserved; they are some of the oldest homes in our country.

Location: This marker is located in the Hamlet of Fish House on the north side of Route 110, just past the intersection of Route 109.

SHEW HOUSE BUILT 1784 BY GODFREY SHEW
AND HIS SONS JOHN, STEPHEN AND JACOB AFTER THEIR RETURN
FROM CANADA AS PRISONERS OF COL. ROSS ON JUNE 3, 1778

OLD SHEW HOME:

This old home in the hamlet of Fish House dates back to 1784 and is considered one of the oldest in the town of Northampton. The original home had been destroyed during the raids through the area during the Revolutionary War. This home is one of the few existing 18th century homes in the town of Northampton. If you would like to find more information on this early Fish House Families, see Donald Sawyer's Book, "They came to see Sacandaga".

Location: This marker is located on Route 110 in the hamlet of Fish House, on the south side of the road in the front of the old home. This is the last house in the hamlet before you cross the Fulton County line into Saratoga County.

 

ANDERSON CEMETERY:

Location: right next to the I-Go-Inn on South Shore Road.

FIRST SCHOOL

Town's first school built on this site on land given by Jonathan Anderson. Earliest district in town settled in 1787. Located on South Shore Road in Edinburg.

Location:

BATCHELLERVILLE

Presbyterian church erected in 1867, moved to present site in 1930 to escape the rising waters of the Sacandaga Reservoir.

Location: South Shore Road, Edinburg

GPS: 43° 12.551' N, 74° 4.893' W.

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GREAT SACANDAGA LAKE

Created in 1930 as the Sacandaga Reservoir. Ten Communities were lost to the rising Waters

Location: South Shore Road, Edinburg

OLD COUNTRY STORE

Built in 1875 on west side main street opposite Fox Hill Road by Faulkner Noyes and Charles Wait. At times a Post Office. Moved to it's present site c. 1929

Location: South Shore Road, Edinburg

BATCHELLERVILLE

On this site was located the historic village of Batchellerville inundated in 1930 by the Sacandaga Reservoir.

Location: South Shore Road, Edinburg

 Location:

BEECHER HOLLOW

Methodist Church built in 1836 due to strong influence of early Beecher Hollow settler Jesse Barker II. A revolutionary War hero.

Location: Edinburg Four Corners.

TOWN MEETING

First town meeting held on this site March 13th, 1801 at the home of James Goodwin. Town named Northfield name changed to Edinburg in 1808.

Location: Edinburg Four Corners.

BEECHER HOLLOW

Historic hamlet settled in 17'90's along the banks of Beecher Creek. Now the site of Nellie Tyrrell Museum

Location: North Shore Road Edinburg

BEECHER'S STORE

Early Stage Coach Stop and Site of town's first post office. Original house built c. 1802. Post office moved to Edinburg 4-Corners in 1948.

Location: Just off North Shore Road, Edinburg

GPS:

More info



Barker's Store & Sumner Home 1847
Cortesy of The Edinburg Historical Society

BARKER'S STORE

Built in 1847 by John Barker, operated continuously as a store until 1945. Believed to be a stop in the underground railroad.

Location: Just off North Shore Road, Edinburg

GPS: 43° 13.291' N, 74° 6.23' W.

More Info

 

CARRIAGE SHOP

Erected prior to 1828, Arad & Leonard Copeland operated the water-powered shop. In 1884 converted to machine shop by John W. Latcher.

Location: North Shore Road, Edinburg

GPS: 43° 13.247' N, 74° 6.095' W.

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COVERED BRIDGE:

Built by Arad Copeland below Beecher Falls in 1879. Only NYS Queenpost Truss bridge. Placed on NYS and National register in 1998.

Location: North Shore Road, Edinburg

GPS: 43° 13.258' N, 74° 6.021' W.

Arad Copeland (1805-1884) came with his family from Guilford, Vermont to the Sacandaga Valley in 1815, first settling in the Town of Day. In 1828 Arad and his brother Leonard moved to the Town of Edinburgh, purchasing Ely Beecher’s sawmill and carriage factory located along Beecher Creek.

Arad married Anna Elizabeth Trowbridge, daughter of Edinburgh resident Willard Trowbridge. The Trowbridges’ operated a brick kiln behind their home on what is now Sinclaire road. As a wedding gift Willard donated the bricks for a house and Arad built the home for his bride c.1832. The house still stands today across the road from the covered bridge.

Arad had 35 acres across Beecher Creek where he had garden and pasture land. An open bridge below the house gave access to this acreage until it was destroyed by melting spring snow and ice. In 1879 he then decided to build the covered bridge that still stands today. According to family legend local residents Melzor Manning laid the stones, Jacob Latcher hewed the timbers and Azariah Ellithorpe Jr. framed the bridge.

Over the years the bridge received a new metal roof, new flooring and some side boards were replaced. The bridge is 35 feet long and is New York State’s only queenpost truss. A popular tourist attraction the bridge has been photographed from all angles, painted by visiting artists and even played host to a few wedding ceremonies. The only covered bridge left in Saratoga county it has always been used for animal and pedestrian traffic.

Arad had 35 acres across Beecher Creek where he had garden and pasture land. An open bridge below the house gave access to this acreage until it was destroyed by melting spring snow and ice. In 1879 he then decided to build the covered bridge that still stands today. According to family legend local residents Melzor Manning laid the stones, Jacob Latcher hewed the timbers and Azariah Ellithorpe Jr. framed the bridge.

More Info

Courtesy of The Edinburg Historical Society - Read More Here

Read more about Covered Bridges in the Sacandaga Valley Here

FIRST HOUSE BUILT IN OLD NORTHVILLE SETTLEMENT:

This marks the site of an early settler's home, Samuel Olmsted. located in what is today the village of Northville. Samuel's gravestone is just up the street in the old Northville Village cemetery, next to the gate entrance which denotes him as the first settler. This marker was installed in 1976 during our country's American Revolution Bicentennial.

Location: This marker is on the South Main Street in the Village of Northville, pass Van Arnam Street on the west side.

 

NORTHERN MOST TERMINAL OF THE F. J. & G. RAILROAD:

This marker designates the site of the Northville Depot, marking the northern most extent of the old Fonda, Johnstown, and Gloversville railroad line. In the fall of the year, when waters of the Great Sacandaga recede, you can see the old foundation of this station which was located behind this sign, over and toward the old river bank. A special committee was set up in the country during the American revolution Bicentennial, which was comprised of railroad enthusiasts from Gloversville, Johnstown and Northville, who agreed this site should be marked. They put on a special exhibit in the Northville School Cafeteria along with the dedication that day in 1976. The photograph of this dedication and committee can be found in "The History of Fulton County" by Lewis G. Decker, as well as other pictures of other town dedications. This marker in addition notes the amusement park that was near and was run by the F.J. and G. Railroad.

Location: the original location of this marker was on the southeast corner of the intersection of Route 30 North and the entrance to the Northville Bridge and Village. When the new bridge was built and the intersection widened, the sign was relocated where it is today, on the northeast side in a small park.

GPS:43° 13.439' N, 74° 11.066' W

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ADIRONDACK INN

Built in 1891 by the FJ & G Railroad conspired the gem of the Sacandaga Park this ornate wood structure burned in 1975.

Location: McKinley Road - Sacandaga Park

GPS: 43° 12.968' N, 74° 11.258' W.

Regarding Adirondack Inn. "...A short distance from the railroad station is The Adirondack Inn, one of the finest summer resort hotels in America, accommodating

By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 1, 2008

250 guests. The halls and rooms are provided with steam heat, and the hotel grounds lighted by electricity, presenting at night a picture of a veritable "Fairy Garden." Guests may secure rooms single or en suite, with or without a private bath. The house is tastefully decorated and richly furnished, and the conveniences of the telegraph, the telephone, and a prompt postal service are among the privileges enjoyed by its guests. Balls, House Parties, Automobiling and Coaching go to make up a part of the pleasures at this up-to-date hostelry. The roads along the Mohawk Valley, passing through Schenectady, Amsterdam, Johnstown and Gloversville, en route the Sacandaga Valley, are particularly good for automobiling. The Adirondack Inn is ably managed by Mr. C. O. Chamberlin, to whom applications for rates and rooms should be addressed."
Source: "1906 Summer Outings Sacandaga Valley; The Pleasure and Benefits of a Few Weeks of Leisure Spent Among the Beautiful Resorts of the Adirondacks," Published by Passenger Department, Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville Railroad"

In the early 1890s many short line railroads were building amusement parks as a way to increase rail line patronage. In 1891 the Fonda Johnstown & Gloversville (FJ&G) purchased thirty-five acres of land near the end of its Sacandaga Line and made it into a summer resort called Sacandaga Park, and built the

More Info

marker

SWEETS CROSSING:

F.J.&G. RR Crossed here at Levi & Zeruah farm.

The Sweet Family provided food to stranded passengers durring blizzard of March 1888.

William C. Pomeroy Foundation 2015 245

KING CEMETERY:

This is the site of an early cemetery in the Town of Northampton and the marker credits Henry King as an early settler in this portion of the town. The cemetery contains graves from sites which were removed during the flooding of the Great Sacandaga Lake. Note the grave of Jason Bacon and Civil War Soldier, Tring

Location: This marker is on Old Route 30 ( today Route 152), just north of the Houseman Street intersection and South of Sacandaga Park, on the west side of Route 152.

 

 WOODWORTH FARM

CONVEYED BY COMMISSIONERS
OF FORFEITURE TO WILLIAM G.
WOODWORTH IN 1786. SERVED IN
REVOLUTION. PASSED TO HIRAM
WOODWORTH 1810-1910.

SITE OF OLD WOODSWORTH FARM:

The Woodsworth family were early settlers in the town of what is today Mayfield, and they played an important part in the American cause for our independence during the American Revolution. The property that this sign refers, was procured by one of the Woodsworth sons, William G. Woodsworth, where he settled after the Revolutionary War. As the marker states, it was passed on to his son Hiram who owned the farm from 1810 to 1910 and it was known as the old Woodsworth Farm. The marker was installed in 1936 and suggested by E. J. Ruliffson, an early Mayfield Historian. (Note: In the Town of Bleeker, over the mountain behind this area, is Woodworth lake, named after this family and until recent years used as a boy Scout Camp)

Location: This marker is located on Phelp's Street ( Route 102) near Riceville side. Take Route 30A north until you come to the Phelps Street intersection. Proceed west on Phelps Street ( Route 102) and you will pass the Mayfield Grange Hall and marker will be just around the corner on the north side of the road.

More about the Woodsworths from Fulton County NYGenWeb

 


HOME OF WILLIAM BROWER, INVENTOR:

ON THIS SITE IN 1916 WM C BROWER INVENTEDAND PATENTED THE FIRST SAP GRAVITY FLOW TUBING SYSTEMFROM TREE TO SUGAR HOUSE FOR MAKING MAPLE SYRUP.

On this farm site was the home of William Brower who is credited with first introducing the use of tubing by gravity, making the maple sap flow from the Maple Trees, which in turn makes maple sugar. William as well has been credited in coming up with some other remarkable ideas in his day. The Mayfield Historical Society, along with the Town of Mayfield, saw it fitting to give him recognition by dedicating this marker in 1993.

Location: This marker is located on the road called the "Mountain Road" Route 123, north off route 30. It is located on the south side and approximately two miles up the Mountain Road. It was installed 1993.

Tintype Photo of William C Brower SR (1843-1925) with his sisters Elizabeth (1841-?) and Lucretia (1840-1873). Photo taken approx. 1862. Note private stripes on the sleeve of his uniform. William served in the 10th NY Cavalry Co I. More

 


WOOSWORTH BURRYING GROUND:

This marker directs you to the burying ground of early settlers, but was used by the Woodsworth family. This cemetery was on part of the Woodsworth Farm and near by at the crossroad, is what is called Woodsworth Corners The Woodsworth's played an important part in the American Revolution from old Tyron County. This marker was installed in memory of this historic family in 1936. (Note: Near by and on the same side of the road, is believed to be an early burial ground for the Quakers who had established a Meeting House which was located on the opposite side of the road in early 1800's both of which should be marked some day in the future)

Location: Take (Route 146), West Main street Extension (west), off Route 30A north; the marker is on the north side of the road, just before the crossroads of Jackson Summit Road and old Route 30.

 

AMASA STEPHEN

Was Murdered near here by Sir. John Johnson and his loyalist and Indian allies May 22, 1780 raid. Early settler and Patriot.

Location:

On May 22nd, Colonel Sir John Johnson with about 500 Indians and Loyalists were in the Mohawk Valley burning and killing. Just about dawn the enemy appeared at the Stephens home. They broke the door in and immediately headed to where the Stephens were sleeping. The Indians dragged Stephens from his bed and took him outside. On reaching outside the Indians tomahawked and scalped Amasa and then hung him on the fence near the house. The enemy then plundered the house and then left without harming Mrs. Stephens or her children.

After the enemy left, Mrs. Stephens went looking for her husband and on going outside she discovered him hung on the fence. She took him down and took his body back into the house. Mrs. Stephens immediately grabbed her two children and headed for Fort Johnstown and she arrived there a few hours later. On arriving at Fort Johnstown Mrs. Stephens met her mother and learned that her father and brother were killed.

The above is transcribed from pages 39-49 of the book, Fulton County in the Revolution By James F. Morrison and typed by dedicated volunteer, Peggy Menear for Fulton County NYGenWeb
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BURYING GROUND
OF MAJOR HARMON AND
FRANCIS VAN BUREN
 SEVENTH
ALBANY COUNTY REGIMENT;
REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
SETTLERS ON THIS LAND.

THE BURIAL SITE OF TWO REVOLUTIONARY WAR VETRANS:

This marker directs you up a narrow dirt road that leads to some summer camps. In the yard of one of these camps is a boulder with an inscription to two Revolutionary War Soldiers buried here; Major Harmon and Francais Van Buren, who had settled here after the Revolutionary war and who had served in the Albany County Militia. In seeking this site I would ask you to use caution and courtesy as this grave site is on private land.

Location: This marker is located on the old Vanderburgh Point Road east off Route 30. Follow Vanderburgh Point Road and just past the intersection of Perique Road (known locally as Perique Corners), you will discover this marker on the north side of the road just before you reach Vanderburgh Point, the Beach and the Sacandaga Reservoir.

 

RICEVILLE CEMETERY: HERE ARE BURIED JONATHAN FISK - OLIVER RICE - WILLIAM WOODSWORTH - SAMUEL WOODSWORTH - JESSE FOOTE -ISAAC BEMIS - JONATHAN CANFIELD - SOLDIERS OF THE REOLUTION

This old burial ground in the town of Mayfield marks the graves of several old settlers and veterans of the American Revolution. (Note: there is a glacial boulder placed in front of this cemetery with an attached bronze marker which gives notice of the revolutionary war soldiers buried here).

Location: This marker is in front of the cemetery on the north side of old Route 30 (Riceville Road), just south of old Route 30 (Riceville Road), just south of Phelp's Street (Route 102) intersection; (Next to George Whitman's Taxidermy Studio)

 

BAPTIST CHURCH

OF MAYFIELD AND BROADALBIN
ORGANIZED HERE IN 1792,
THEN THE HOME OF CALEB
WOODWORTH, SOLDIER OF REVOLUTION, FIRST SETTLER

OLD BAPTIST CHURCH SITE:

This marker designates the site of the old Mayfield and Broadalbin Baptist Church, established here in 1792 at the home of Caleb Woodsworth. Caleb had served in the American Revolution and was one of the first settlers in this locality.

Location: This marker is on Route 30A north; turn off at the intersection (north side), onto old Route 30 (old Riceville Road). It is located three or four doors down from the intersection. (Note: This intersection is just past the old Greystone Inn on Route 30A)

 

THE OLD MILL SITE KNOWN AS ROMEYN'S MILL:

This mill was originally erected by Sir William Johnson to help induce settlement into the old Mayfield Patent. It was built here on the old Mayfiled creek that emptied into the old Sacandaga Vlaie ( a water powered mill). After the American Revolution it was run by an early settler, Abraham Romeyn, and because known as Romeyn's Mill. Abraham, after the war for our independence, became a commanding officer in the Montgomery County Militia. (Note: At one time this section of Mayfield was called Shawville, named after Captain Shaw, a Civil War Officer who resided on the hill above the marker, at the south east corner of the intersection of Lakeside Drive and South School Street).

Location: The marker is located on the east side of South School Street (old Route 30) in Shawville. It is at the end of the bridge, across the Mayfield Little Lake Outlet and the Great Sacandaga Reservoir. This marker was installed in 1932 and suggested by John T. Morrison.

GPS: 43° 5.85' N, 74° 15.407' W.

More Info

See HISTORY of MAYFIELD BY: WASHINGTON FROTHINGHAM PUBLISHED 1892

 

 

SITE OF DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF MAYFIELD, 1783-1826.

CHURCHYARD CONTAINING
REMAINS OF MANY PIONEERS OF THIS SECTION

SITE OF THE OLD MAYFIELD DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH:

This old church was established in 1793 and stood on this site until 1826. The churchyard was used for burials of some of Mayfield's early settlers. It was later extended into today's Mayfield Cemetery, the oldest burials being on the side where the marker is. (Note: Inside this cemetery is an impressive memorial to the soldiers of the Civil War who had served in a cavalry unit under command of Captain Getman. It is a large tall column with an officer portrayed on top with his sword drawn; on the column are listed the men who served in this unit)

Location: this marker is within the Village of mayfield on SOuth School street, near the entrance of the Mayfield Cemetery and across from the Mayfield high School. This marker was installed in 1936 and was suggested by E.J. Ruliffson.

 

ANTHONYVILLE:

On these corners was the residence of an early Quaker family by the name of Anthony. On the corner of this marked site was built the first brick home in the town of Mayfield. This became an old place-name in the town, called Anthonyville. Across the road, and by the creek was a prosperous blacksmith shop that produced scythes and axes and farm implements. The old brick home on this corner became the birthplace of George T. Anthony, a Quaker like the rest of the family. He moved out into the Western part of New York State and during the Civil War became an officer, later he became the Governor of the State of Kansas from 1876-1879. This family has a very interesting history and in the future should be researched further.

Location: This marker is on Route 30 north, at the Brower Road intersection ( east side). This intersection is by the Anthony Creek crossing on Route 30 and before you reach Routes 30A and 30 north intersection. This marker was unveiled November 17th of 1994.

 

 INDIAN RAID

JACOB DUNHAM AND SAMUEL. HIS SON, KILLED HERE APRIL 1779. OTHERS OF THE FAMILY ESCAPED BY HIDING IN THE WOODS SITE OF THEIR HOME.

INDIAN RAID (AMERICAN REVOLUTION):

This marker marks the site of Jacob Dunham home, an early settler in the old town of Mayfield. It denotes the location where Jacob and his son Samuel were killed during an Indian Raid in April of 1779. Legend has it that the Indians decapitated Jacob's head and placed it on the horns of the family cow and sent it home, where to the horror of his remaining family, it was discovered. The rest of the family managed to escape and hide in the woods until the raiding party left. Ghostly stories have emerged from this locality in the past.

Location: This marker is just off Route 30, north past the village of Mayfield (located on the old portion of Route 30) and today called the Ferguson Road, near the Paradise Point Road intersection

 

RICE HOMESTEAD

BUILT ABOUT 1790 BY
OLIVER RICE A SOLDIER OF THE AMERICAN
REVOLUTION, SERVING UNDER GENERAL WASHINGTON.

OLD OLIVER RICE HOMESTEAD:

This old home today has become the headquarters and museum for the Mayfield Historical Society, where a number of events take place throughout the year. The home was built by Oliver Rice after the American Revolution. Oliver had been a veteran during the Revolutionary War. It has remained in the Rice family until it was recently procured by the Mayfield Historical society and it is being restored as one of the town's old 18th century homes.

Location: The marker is on old Route 30, in Riceville. The back of the home can be seen on the west side of Route 30, just past the intersection of Route 30A and 30, after you pass over the mayfield Creek. Turn off Route 30 at the Second Ave. Extension (West). This is at the intersection where Mr. Softee's Ice Cream Stand is located; at the end of Second Street Extension turn again south on old Route 30, (old Riceville road). The marker is in the front of the Rice Homestead (Mayfield Museum).

more about the rice homestead
from the Mayfied Historical Society

 

SACANDAGA BLOCKHOUSE (MAYFIELD FORT)

This has become a controversial marker in our country, due to its location and title. Early records refer to it as the Sacandaga Blockhouse. There was a symposium forum on this subject a few years ago that lasted nearly a year, while trying to determine the proper location of this old blockhouse. Early documents that described this fortification as being in Lot #14 of the sacandaga Patent, places this site down the road and out in the Lake, underwater today ( and actually in what is today the Town of Broadalbin). This old blockhouse was built during our American Revolutionary War and was known to have been under attack once when Soloman Woodsworth used it for his headquarters.

Location: The marker is on the Vandenburg Point Road, near what was once known as Munsonville. It is located in front of a farm on the north side of the road, before the Perque Road intersection.

 

THE NINE MILE TREE MARKER:

Sir William Johnson laid out a carriage road from Fort Johnson, in the Mohawk Valley, to his summer cottage on the old Sacandaga Vlaie. On every mile of this road, he blazed a marker on a tree, designating the distance from his home in Fort Johnson. For years a large pine tree stood at this intersection, on the opposite corner of this marker (northeast corner) and then in later years all that remained was a large stump. This old pine tree with its mark, designated the ninth mile. All that remains today is the name of the road across from the marker "The Nine Mile Tree Road" and this historic marker. The original marker was installed in the early 1930's and was believed to have been suggested by Robert W. Chambers It was destroyed by a snow plow and the present marker was replaced during the Country's Revolutionary War Bicentennial 1976.

Location: This marker is on Route 30 north, just before Red Bunch on the south east corner of the Lathrop Road, across from the intersection of the Nine Mile Tree Road. ( It was placed on the opposite corner of the original tree for safety reasons; to afford a place to turn off the road to read the sign.) (Note: the original sign read " Site of Nine-Mile-Tree Celebrated Land Mark on Sir William Johnson's Fish House Road During Revolutionary War").

 

 

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